Tuesday, 24th April 2018
24 April 2018
Image result for bone sewing needles and sinew thread to patch together pieces of leather

Hand sewing stitches

Hand sewing stitches

Brief history of sewing

People have been sewing for a long time. They began using bone needles with eyes to stitch animal skins together at least 2,000 years ago, during the last Ice Age; started making needles from iron about 4,000 years ago, at the very beginning of the Iron Age; and first used thimbles in China about 2,000 years ago, during the Han dynasty.

Sewing is present almost as long as humans.  Cavemen used bone sewing needles and sinew thread to patch together pieces of leather to cover themselves when temperature was  unbearable. Their version of “sewing” was all completed by large, leathery caveman-hand. Then there is evidence of hand sewing in many indigenous cultures. Native Americans and tribes in Africa were crafting needles out of random objects and sewing together hides, leaves, and whatever other fabric type material they could get their hands on.

Then maybe around 40,000 BC,  in Central Asia, they had the idea to make a hole in the end of the awl and thread the first needle. This made sewing a lot faster and easier, and soon the new idea spread to other cold places like northern Europe and North America. People made these early needles out of bone and ivory, like awls.

It was over 1500 years later in 1790, that the first workable sewing machine was invented and patented by the British inventor Thomas Saint. Earlier, in 1755, Karl Weisenthal, a German inventor, devised the first sewing macine needle, but did not produce a complete machine. Saint’s machine, which was designed to sew leather and canvas, mainly on boots, used only a single thread and formed a chain stitch. Instead of a needle, an awl was employed to pierce a hole through the material being sewed.

In 1830 a French tailor, Barthelemy Thimonnier (1793-1857), patented the first practical sewing machine. It employed a hook-tipped needle, much like an embroidery needle, that was moved downward by a cord-connected foot treadle and returned by a spring. Like Thomas Saint’s machine, it produced a chain stitch.

Image result for first practical sewing machine

he first functional sewing machine was invented by the French tailor, Barthelemy Thimonnier, in 1830. Thimonnier’s machine used only one thread and a hooked needle that made the same chain stitch used with embroidery. The inventor was almost killed by an enraged group of French tailors who burnt down his garment factory because they feared unemployment as a result of his new invention.

Butterick was the first company on the scene to publish sewing patterns that women used to quickly construct a garment they had been eyeing at their local department store. Many other pattern makers soon followed, and home sewing became commonplace in most households. Garment making by the average housewife was now the norm.

Sewing stitches

  1. Running stitch

The running stitch is good for outlining an embroidery design and is a very quick stitch to do. There are two ways to do the running stitch: the first method is similar to hand sewing and can be completed by pushing the needle and floss in and over the fabric in one continuous motion; the second method can be literally pushing the needle through the fabric and pulling it back up. I have heard this called the “punch and poke” or “stabbing” method.

Steps

Image result for running stitch instruction images

a. Begin the running stitch by poking your threaded needle up through the fabric.
b. Poke the needle back down through the fabric about 1/2 cm next to where you just came up, and pull the thread down.
c. Now poke your needle back up through the fabric, leaving the same 1/2 cm from the previous stitch. Then poke the needle back down through the fabric like the first stitch again making your second stitch
d. Continue this to your stipulated distance

2. Back stitch

Back stitch is a stitch used in embroidery and sewing stitches. Stitches are sewn backwards to the direction of the sewing. They form lines and usually used to outline shapes or add detail to an embroidered picture. It’s an especially suitable stitch for creating fine lines and details, as well as forming a foundation for combination stitches

Steps

Image result for back stitch instruction images

a. Bring the needle up through the back or wrong side of the fabric until you hit the knot.
b.  Poke the needle back down through the fabric about 1/2 cm next to where you just came up, and pull the thread down.
c.  Now poke your needle back up through the fabric, leaving the same 1/2 cm from the previous stitch, ( note: till this point it is like running stitch then comes the change)
d. Now poke the needle back next to the hole of your previous stitch and pull it down the fabric
e. now again bring the needle up by poking about 1/2 cm in front of the stitch you made now
f. again bring the needle down the fabric by poking just in front of the previous stitch.
g. Continue this to the stipulated distance

 

3. Split stitch

 

Split stitch is another stitch that is useful for outlining. I learned recently that this stitch was used extensively in the Middle Ages for embroidering faces because it lends itself to subtle shading when it’s worked in rows as a filling stitch. It’s also sometimes called Kensington outline stitch.

Image result for split stitch instruction images

Steps

a. Insert the needle into the fabric and draw it through to the top. Continue drawing it through until the knot at the tail of your embroidery floss hits the back of the fabric
b. Poke the needle back down through the fabric about 1/2 cm next to where you just came up, and pull the thread down.
c. bring the needle back to the top of the fabric by picking in the centre of the first made stitch
d. Then again bring the needle to down of the fabric by poking the fabric about 1/2 cm from the poked point in front of the first stitch.
e. Again bring the needle up of the fabric by inserting it in the second hole of the first made stitch and splitting the second stitch.
f. Again poke the fabric about 1/2 cm in front of the made stitch
g.Continue this to the stipulated distance

4. Stem stitch

This stitch is also known by names like Crewel stitch, stalk stitch and South Kensington stitchThis is a great outline stitch which can be used to sew outlines of all embroidery designs, for sewing stems in your floral designs and also works in outlining very tight curves easily and prettily.

Image result for stem stitch instruction  images

Steps 

a.  Insert the needle into the fabric and draw it through to the top. Continue drawing it through until the knot at the tail of your embroidery floss hits the back of the fabric
b. Poke the needle back down through the fabric about 1 cm next to where you just came up, and pull the thread down.
c. bring the needle back to the top of the fabric by picking in the centre of the side of the first made stitch (note in split stitch the needle is brought splitting the thread of the previous stitch but here it has to be brought through the side at the centres of the previous stitch)
d. Again insert the needle about 1 cm next to the last stitch and repeat the same to the stipulated end.

5. satin stitch

A good filler stitch, the satin stitch creates a smooth appearance. I like to use this stitch to fill in hearts or the leaves of flowers. Take your needle and floss and create one stitch. Bring the needle up again just next to the opposite side of the initial stitch. Keep the stitches close to one another, as required to fill the pattern or design you are working with.

Image result for satin stitch instruction  images

Steps

a. Bring your needle to the front of the fabric by poking at a corner of your shape.
b. Bring it down below the fabric by poking at the other end of the shape
c. Again bring it on top of the fabric and repeat it till you fill the shape

6. french knot

The French Knot is a simple embroidery stitch that creates a nubby, little three-dimensional dot. It works great alone, or strung together in lines, or clustered to form a lovely piled surface. Learn right here how to whip out this very useful decorative stitch!

Image result for french knot stitch instruction  images

Steps

a. Poke the needle at the centre point where you want to place the stitch and then wrap the thread around the needle twice.
b. Then pull the needle vertically down just at the side of the first prick and in the centre fo the knot below the fabric a knot will be formed on the top at the place where you pricked the needle
c. repeat this at several points where you want to place the knots sometimes to fill a shape or sometimes to put few knots here and there.

7. Chain stitch

Chain stitch is the simplest of the crochet stitches, and forms the foundation of most crochet work. It can also be used as a technique on its own – it basically creates a chain of stitches!

Image result for images of chain stitch instructions

Steps

a. . Insert the needle into the fabric and draw it through to the top. Continue drawing it through until the knot at the tail of your embroidery floss hits the back of the fabric
b. Poke the needle almost at the same point where you entered and bring the needle out at about 1/2 cm in front of the original prick point.
c. Before taking the needle out on top of the fabric make a loop of the thread around the needle.
d. then pull the needle out now a chain would have formed around the thread.
e. Again prick through the same hole as the thread has come out and bring the needle above the fabric from about 1/2 cm from the point of prick.
f. Then again make a loop around the needle and pull the needle out
g. repeat the same till the stipulated end and complete the stitch

8. Lazy daisy

These are detached chain stitch used to make a floral pattern each stitch forming one petal of a flower

Image result for images of lazy daisy stitch instructions

Steps

a. This  stitch is usually done to make a petal of a small flower
b. First poke at the lower end of the petal.
c. then bring the needle out in top of the fabric at the other end of the petal.
d. Before bringing the needle out make a loop of the thread around the needle
e. pull the needle out and adjust the loop so that it fits the size of the petal.
f. Then bring the needle doun of the fabric by pricking just immideatly in front of the point where the thread came out
g. Complete the stitch below the fabric. Repeat this for each petal your flower becomes complete

9. Feather stitch

Feather stitch is a wonderfully versatile, decorative, surface embroidery stitch that is also known as single coral stitch and briar stitch. Feather stitch is found extensively on traditional English smocks, Dorset embroidery and on crazy quilts.

Image result for images of feather stitch instructions

Steps

a. Insert the needle into the fabric and draw it through to the top. Continue drawing it through until the knot at the tail of your embroidery floss hits the back of the fabric
b. Bring the neelde out about 1 cm exactly in line with first stitch
c. then bring the stitch out in the centre of both the pricks and bring the thread out.
d. Again bring the neelde out at 1 cm in line with the last prick
e. then again prick in between these two pricks and bring the thread out
f. Now bring the needle at 1 cm to the left of the last prick and bring the needle out at the centre of the two last pricks
g. repeat this to the stipulated distance and complete the stitich

 

 

 

 

 

Comments

comments

It's only fair to share…

Leave a Reply